She’s A Friend, Lesson Student and Fellow Horse Nut

She is SABRINA!


My dear friend Sabrina is probably the other piece of whatever I came from because aside from our taste buds we could not be more alike or more understanding of one another. It’s invaluable to have a friend feel so much like family. It’s a wonder how I went 25 years without knowing her, and I truly don’t know where I’d be without her anymore! Please enjoy these fabulous shots of miss Sabrina from our first cowgirl inspired photoshoot here as I go through this post. 🙂

Cowgirl Sabrina
One major thing we have in common is an unmistakeable and undeniable complete adoration for horses. The smell, the sounds, the feel and the mere company of a horse often brings us together after a bad or good day and it’s at the barn that we’ve spent many good nights talking and relaxing. There’s a special kind of therapy two friends enjoy when sitting out in a lawn chair, drinking a good beer, listening to the sound of a horse chomp-chomping away at grass next to you.


Along with that I’ve been teaching Sabrina the basics of horseback riding and horse care. She picks up everything as we go along and is quick to recall a past instruction. It’s a breeze to teach her and seeing as how she’s my first official [unofficial] lesson student, this is a great thing for me too. I know not everyone that I have the pleasure of teaching come the future will be this readily spongeable, if you will, but it’s great to have this positive reinforcement while I’m starting to teach.

Cowgirl Sabrina


Thank you girl for being in my life and sharing this great love I have for horses with me. You’re an asset to my barn and my family. Here’s to many more good times!

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What’s the Point of all This?

There are times I ask myself that question, especially on the days when my horse(s) and I aren’t communicating effectively and things go wrong. I may blame her and let my emotions (usually sheer frustration) cloud the big picture; what I really should be seeing and what’s needed FROM ME to correct it. I like that in reading Downunder Horsemanship it’s put into BLACK and WHITE words: If your horse is not performing correctly or is misbehaving, it’s 98.9% always YOUR fault. The bottom line is for me that I always want to learn and improve. You don’t get to the level I want to be at by faking it and getting your feelings hurt. You have to educate yourself and allow others to educate you! Everybody wants something out of life but not everybody gets their dreams fulfilled.

One way I’m educating myself is by reading Clinton Anderson’s and Stacy Westfall’s training books. CA’s book goes into depth about horse psychology which is INCREDIBLY important since you can’t understand the choices you’re making until you know why those decisions are necessary. SW’s book is very exercise oriented and each stage and maneuver is detailed and explained in such a coherent way, which I especially like because cut and dry instruction are easiest for me to follow. It’s a very straight forward method. Both of them are, in fact. I get a great deal out of each of them but I’m not finished yet!

I have also borrowed a handful of VHS tapes of various CA and Chris Cox training sessions from my barn guy which I’ve only just started watching. I can tell I will need some extra practice watching Chris Cox because he doesn’t have the same flow of communication that the other two do. I noticed that when I watched one of the RTTH competitions recently. He does not allow his viewers to follow along quite as well, he simply takes action and sums up. There’s no detailing what exactly he did, why, or how. This would not matter much to me if I had a better level of understanding of the things I’m specifically watching him to learn, however I will manage this by taking notes and asking questions to those who know better.

Life is metamorphosing before my eyes and I’m going to continue to change with it. I’m taking the road to my training career  more seriously as well as certain smaller scale life goals, and I’m not disappointing myself. I wish I had more pictures to share but that will have to wait until next time!


 

Goals for Arizona’s next refresher session:

  • Groundwork for respect.
  • Groundwork for basic riding cues.
  • Quiet mounting exercises.

Goals for Powder’s next training session:

  • Lunging and respect groundwork.
  • Desensitizing body with hands and rope.
  • Desensitizing the space around us with lunge whip and string.